CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Alginate encapsulation enhances stem cell therapy for heart regeneration

Modified alginate molecules when used to encapsulate rat mesenchymal stem cells helped in their improved cell survival and potentiated the efficacy of therapy in acute myocardial infarction (MI). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. New neutrophil progenitor discovered

Mass cytometry has revealed a very early unipotent human bone marrow neutrophil progenitors which are CD117 +CD71 + Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Cells turn to a high-plastic state during Lung Cancer Evolution - Chemoresistance explained

Cancer cells go through a high-plasticity cell state (HPCS) which have high capacity for differentiation and proliferation and lead to poor survival and chemoresistance. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Boost immunity in stem cell transplant recipients by delaying antiviral treatment- says study

Since cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) helps in immune reconstitution, researchers have now suggested to delay anti-viral medications against CMV. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. DNA damage triggers the cell reprogramming

Transient induction of DNA damage strand breaks has been shown to trigger the reprogramming of differentiated leaf cells into stem cells without cell death. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. New stem cell model to study brain cancer

Researchers have studied a new model of medulloblastoma using iPS-derived neural stem cells with a familial mutation which has helped them to understand the initiation and progression of this childhood cancer. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Islet like organoids created for diabetes treatment

Human islet-like organoids (HILOs) were generated from from induced pluripotent stem cells which were able to restore glucose homeostasis in immune-competent diabetic mice for 50 days. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Resident stem cells stimulated to regenerate the cartilage tissue

Study has shown that it is possible to stimulate resident skeletal stem-cell (SSC) populations to generate cartilage for treatment of localized chondral disease in Osteoarthirits. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Clinical trials for treating COVID analysed

A study has thoroughly analysed the outcomes of ongoing clinical studies on stem cells in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Retinoic acid to improve Stem cell therapy for intestinal disorders

Retinoic acid has been shown to alter the axial identity of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC)-derived neural crest cells which are capable of generating enteric neurons in vitro. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. If you swap bodies, your memory can be altered. Yes, in a study when researchers studied pairs of friends swapping bodies in a perceptual illusion, a person's belief became more similar to their beliefs about their friends' personalities. Also, this study showed that memory is governed by psychological and physical sense of self and memory can become impaired when our mental self-concept doesn't match our physical self.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 26 August 2020 and Science, 2020; 101429

2. Juvenile social isolation can lead to profound mental disorders later in life. When juvenile social isolation in mice was studied, specific sub-populations of brain cells in the prefrontal cortex that are required for normal sociability in adulthood were found to be damaged and this study will help to potentially modulate these regions using techniques like transcranial magnetic stimulation and/or transcranial direct current stimulation to treat psychiatric disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia.     
-Source: : ScienceDaily, 31 August 2020 and Nature Neuroscience, Aug. 31, 2020

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