CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Snake venom gland organoids created in lab

Organoids of the venom glands of the Cape coral snake (Aspidelaps lubricus cowlesi) have been created using adult stem cells and these glands are capable of producing venom. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Mutation from donor can be passed to recipient in bone marrow stem cell transplants – says study

Potentially pathogenic rare clonal mutations have been identified in samples from hematopoietic stem cell donors of various ages which persisted in the transplant recipients also. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Researchers identify mechanism behind stress causing hairs to grey rapidly

Activation of the sympathetic nerves which occurs during stress leads to activation of melanocyte stem cell niche causing their permanent depletion from the niche thereby leading to greying of hair. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. First successful treatment of pain using stem cells

Terminally differentiated human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived GABAergic (iGABAergic) neurons transplanted into spinal cord of mice with neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury has led to significant, long-term pain relief. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Pan-cancer, pan-population T cell immunotherapy identified

Using a genome-wide CRISPR–Cas9 screening, scientists have identified a T cell receptor (TCR) that recognized and killed most human cancer types via a protein MR1, while remaining inert to noncancerous cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Scientist created self-healing xenobots for first time

Scientists have created xenobots from stem cells of African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) and these living machines less than a millimeter (0.04 inches) wide -are able to walk and swim, survive for weeks without food and can even work together in groups. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Non-immunogenic, strong vascular grafts developed using induced pluripotent stem cells

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and biodegradable scaffolds have been used to produce tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) in a non-immunogenic manner but with mechanical strength comparable to native vessels used in arterial bypass grafts. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. CRISPR technology helps create avatars of glioblastoma in lab

CRISPR editing of pluripotent stem cells has been used to develop stem cell models with tumor-associated driver mutations in glioblastoma which can recapitulate all features of patient-derived tumors, including extrachromosomal DNA amplification. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. iPSC model reveals novel clues in Young-onset Parkinson's disease (YOPD)

Induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with YOPD has shown that these people may actually have been born with dysfunctional brain cells which go undetected for decades. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Blood stem cell gene therapy shows promise in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD)

Autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell-based lentiviral gene therapy has shown promise in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), wherein six patients treated in the clinical trial are currently in remission and no longer receiving other treatments. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Beauty and sleep connection may actually be true as scientists have discovered that collagen fibrils which make up significant portion of our body's matrix are sacrificial, i.e breaking as we subject the body to the rigours of the day but are connected with the circadian rhythm getting replenished when we rest at night.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 15 January 2020 and Nature Cell Biology, 2020; 22 (1): 74

2. Contrary to the popular myth that Men are better than women in map reading and other spatial cognition skills, a study has proven that men and women have equal spatial cognition skills but their brains use different gaze strategies to perform the same task.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 27 January 2020 and Scientific Reports, 2019; 9 (1)

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