CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Role of cellular mechanics in blood stem cell regeneration

Deletion of Ptpn21, a protein tyrosine phosphatase highly expressed in blood stem cells makes these cells leave the bone marrow niche as they become more mobile with decreased quiescence, increased apoptosis, and defective reconstitution capacity. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. New approach provides clinical-quality cells for use in regenerative cardiology

A chemically defined, xeno-free laminin-based differentiation protocol has been described to generate stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors (CVPs). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Gene changes with leukemia relapse studied

Study has revealed a transcriptional signature specific for post blood stem cell-transplantation relapses in acute myeloid leukemia and this will help in developing personalized therapies. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Cells aging faster is main cause for neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis – identifies study

A new study reports that cellular senescence occurring in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) may be the main mechanism behind limited remyelination in the disease. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Elite stem cells dominate reprogramming niche

By combining cellular barcoding, mathematical modelling, and lineage tracing approaches scientists have discovered an elite population of stem cells mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) which dominate the reprogramming niche. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Effects of space flight on in vivo regeneration of tissue studied

Date from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has been reviewed and it has been shown that microgravity does not hamper stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but the regeneration potential varies between tissues. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. 'Regnase' controls blood stem cell production

Regnase-1, a member of the CCCH zinc finger protein family has been identified to regulate self-renewal of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and its dysfunction leads to abnormal haematopoiesis. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. iPS cell therapy for damaged cornea – Japan approves human study

Researchers from Osaka University in Japan plan to treat damaged corneas using tissue sheets generated from induced pluripotent stem cells and a Japanese committee has provisionally approved this therapy to be done on human patients. Click to read more...

9. Niche specific control of leukemic stem cells

Niche-specific expression of a particular chemokine called CXCL12 controls quiescence of treatment-resistant leukemic stem cells according to a recent research. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Small molecules help maintain intestine during stem cell aging

Treatment with a small molecule called NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) has been found to rejuvenate intestinal stem cells (ISCs) from aged mice and they also reverse their impaired ability to repair gut damage. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Sleep is essential for nuclear maintenance. Yes, using 3D time-lapse imaging techniques, it has been discovered in live zebrafish that single neurons require sleep in order to perform nuclear maintenance and lack of sleep results in DNA damage.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 5 March 2019 and Nature Communications, 2019; 10 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08806-w

2. Scientists have discovered the long elusive taste centre of the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and novel method of statistical analysis, a specific portion of the insular cortex in the brain hidden behind the neocortex has been found to represents distinct tastes.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 14 March 2019 and Nature Communications, 2019; 10 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08857-z

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