CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Insights into transcription factors influencing ES cells

A network of transcription factors maintain pluripotency of Embryonic stem (ES) cells and now a study has shown that the posttranscriptional control of a specific protein overrides transcriptional control. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Stomach stem cells also fight bacteria – says study

When triggered by R-spondin 3, a signalling molecule, other than increase in proliferation, the basal Lgr5+ cells (stem cells of the stomach) are also induced into secretory cells that express and secrete antimicrobial factors. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Bone marrow secretome is dynamic – reveals study

It has been revealed that secretory signatures of CD133-positive BMSCs are uniquely defined by distinct biological contexts and when there is cardiac infarction, the signals from injured cardiac cells change the secretome to suit the repair of the heart. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Microfluidic platform predicts breast cancer metastasis

Using flow cytometry and a microfluidic single-cell paring and retrieval platform researchers were able to delineate a mechanism by which MSCs in the tumor microenvironment promote metastasis. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Embryonic stem cells decide their fate very early

Challenging the longstanding assumption that embryonic stem cells remain quite plastic and malleable it has been observed in a study that human embryonic stem cells can commit irreversibly to endoderm lineages very quickly. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Scientist find molecular key to activate dormant brain stem cells.

A study has identified STRIPAK molecules to be the essential key to enable reactivation in neural stem cells (NSCs) . Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Microrobots for stem cell delivery

Microrobots carrying mesenchymal stem cells derived from human nose were able to be delivered and manipulated inside the intraperitoneal cavity of a nude mouse. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Blastocystic and extra embryonic stem cells derived from skin cells for the first time

A combination of factors have been used to produce the three in vitro equivalent cell types of the blastocyst, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), induced trophoblast stem cells (iTSCs), and induced extraembryonic endoderm stem cells (iXENs) from skin fibroblasts. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Novel hydrogel supports paracrine function of stem cells

A self-healing hybrid hydrogel has been developed and this hydrogel has been shown to support the action of paracrine factors secreted from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)–hydrogel in regeneration. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Progenitor cell treatment helps babies with lung disorder

Disruption of alveologenesis is associated with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), a fatal lung disorder in the newborn. Researchers have now been able to transplant c-KIT+ endothelial (EC) progenitor cells into the neonatal circulation of mice to increase lung angiogenesis and help in treating BPD. Click to read more...

Really???

1. Octopus' arms have minds of their own. Yes, a new model based on a comprehensive representation of information flow between the octopus's suckers, arms and brain has shown that octopus' suckers can initiate action on their own without waiting for brain commands in response to information from the environment, coordinating with neighboring suckers along the arm.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 25 June 2019 and https://news.agu.org/press-release/researchers-model-how-octopus-arms-make-decisions/

2. It is evolution and not junk food alone, that made humans obese. Despite having nearly identical DNA sequences, there happened critical shifts in how DNA is packaged inside their fat cells between chimps and early humans and as a result, the human body's ability to turn "bad" calorie-storing fat into the "good" calorie-burning kind decreased.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 26 June 2019 and Genome Biology and Evolution, 2019; DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evz134

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