CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Memory T cells stay long in skin after transplant

Tissue-resident memory T cells have been shown to persist in the skin for years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Super immune cells produced by using protein inhibitors

An approach that inhibits the activity of proteins called MEK1/2 has helped to reprogram T cells into regenerative stem cell-like memory (TSCM) cells which act as "super immune cells" with strong antitumor activity. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Stem cell model shows how inherited DNA defects cause squamous cell carcinoma

Patient-derived epidermal stem and progenitor cells (ESPCs) models from Children with Fanconi anemia (FA) has shown that there are inherited DNA defects that cause skin damage in these children leading to deadly squamous cell carcinoma. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Plant stem cell homeostasis mechanism explored

A DEAD-box RNA helicase 27 (RH27) has been identified to play critical roles in miRNA biogenesis, zygote activation, and stem cell homeostasis in plants . Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. New trial to study role of Recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist after stem cell transplantation

Recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra is being studied in a clinical trial for management of mucositis in patients with multiple myeloma treated with intensive chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This study will help understand the role of IL-1 and the role of the microbiota in mucositis. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Novel culture method to grow oligodendrocytes rapidly

Scientists have been able to produce myelin-producing cells called oligodendrocytes, from pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) within a short period of time using a novel culture methodology. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Simple blood assay to accurately assess prognosis of myeloma patients

A serum matrix‐assisted laser desorption ionization time‐of‐flight mass spectrometry (MASS‐FIX) can serve as a simple peripheral blood‐based assay complement to Marrow‐based next‐generation flow cytometry (NGF) following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) to accurately prognosticate patients with myeloma. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Systemic Inflammation alerts neural stem cells

Peripherally induced inflammation has been discovered to promote a transient activation of neural SCs (NSCs) thus proving that stem cells can respond to the systemic milieu. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Telomere protection differs between adult and pluripotent stem cells

A team of researchers have reported that telomeres in pluripotent stem cells are protected very differently than telomeres in adult tissues, especially in terms of TRF2, a component of the telomere-specific shelterin protein complex. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Attracting stem cells without inflammation accomplished

An inflammatory "homing" molecule based drug has been developed to attract lure stem cells to a specific location without causing inflammation. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Scientists have created a unique brain activity signature for a specific individual by employing the participant's verbal descriptions, computational linguistic model and functional MRI (fMRI). These brain signatures will help to develop new approaches to diagnose and study disorders such as dementia, schizophrenia, and depression.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 20 November 2020 Nature Communications, 2020; 11 (1)

2. History made us believe that in early human groups men hunted and women gathered food. Now, proteomic analysis of 9,000-year-old female hunter burial in the Andes Mountains of South America has revealed that it may not be entirely true. About 30 to 50 percent of big game hunters in these evaluated populations were female.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 5 November 2020 and Science Advances, 2020; 6 (45): eabd0310

Creative Commons License All site content, except where otherwise noted is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.