CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Single cell generates entire blastocyst in lab

Starting from a single stem cell type called extended pluripotent stem (EPS) cells, researchers have established a 3D differentiation system that enabled the generation of blastocyst-like structures (EPS-blastoids) through lineage segregation and self-organization. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Viagra increases production of blood stem cell

A rapid, 2-h regimen of a single oral dose of Viagra combined with a single injection of a CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 lead to efficient blood stem cell mobilization comparable to a regimen of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Researchers use stem cell for treating rare genetic disease

Myelin-producing cells called oligodendrocytes derived using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from patients with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a rare genetic condition that can be fatal before 10 years of age has shown that these cells die as a result of iron toxicity, and they can be protected by removing the excess iron using an FDA-approved iron-chelating agent called deferiprone. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Neural crest cells develop earlier – says study

Neural crest cells have been thought to originate in the ectoderm but their plasticity continued to baffle researchers. Now a study has shown that neural crest cells are present in the epiblast of the chick blastula embryo and epiblast is the tissue from which the three germ layers are formed: the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

 

5. Researcher target cancer stem cell using combination of antibody and Imatinib

Targeted inhibition of a protein called pleiotrophin (PTN) combined with the routinely used tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib can eradicate recurrence causing cancer stem cells, as per a recent study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Human brain organoid research raises ethical concerns

Mini-brains or brain organoids are considered as an economical and practical alternative to animal testing. However the fact that in a study a mini-brain grown in lab was roughly analogous in complexity to a human foetal brain at 12 to 13 weeks and that it spontaneously connected itself to a nearby spinal cord and muscle tissue has raised ethical concerns. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Scientists discover regulators of RBC development

A functional genomic screen to identify genes regulating erythropoiesis has identified m6A mRNA marks as the one that promotes the translation of a network of genes required for human erythropoiesis. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Circulating tumour cells can predict breast cancer spread to the brain

Genome-wide sequencing analyses of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer has helped researchers identify regulator genes and proteins within the cells which could serve as a predictor of whether the cells are capable of spreading to brain breaching the blood-brain barrier. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Hyper-long telomeres show beneficial effects in mice

To find whether hyper-long telomeres have harmful effects, researchers generated mice in which 100% of their cells were derived from hyper-long telomere embryonic stem cells and such mice had less incidence of cancer, low cholesterol, improved glucose tolerance and an increased longevity. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. 'Salamander-Like' ability to regrow tissue in humans identified

Analyzing molecular clocks in the cartilage development in humans researchers have uncovered that there is an innate tissue repair capacity in human lower limb cartilages that is associated with expression of limb-regenerative microRNAs similar to the ones found in salamander's limb regeneration. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Blue light such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures can decrease your lifespan according to a study in which Flies subjected to daily cycles of 12 hours in light and 12 hours in darkness had shorter lives compared to those that were kept in complete darkeness or blue light filtered out. Also, the flies exposed to blue light showed damage to their retinal cells and brain neurons and had impaired locomotion
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 17 October 2019 & npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease, 2019 DOI: 10.1038/s41514-019-0038-6

2. Researchers have found the underlying mechanism on why we yawn if someone else does, even if we aren't tired? Contagious yawning which is triggered involuntarily is a common form of echophenomena and using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) it has been found to occur due to primitive reflexes in the primary motor cortex. Scientists have also been able to use electrical stimulation to increase excitability and thereby increase the propensity for contagious yawning. This research will help to develop potential non-drug, personalised treatments, using TMS for modulating imbalances in the brain networks to treat diseases like epilepsy, dementia, autism and Tourette syndrome, which are also associated with increased cortical excitability and/or decreased physiological inhibition.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 31 August 2017 and Current Biology, August 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.07.062

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