CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy halts multiple sclerosis progression

Intrathecal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation in patients with active and progressive multiple sclerosis has shown very good outcome in a clinical trial. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. New type of embryonic pluripotent stem cells derived from mice, horses, and humans

New type of Intermediate Pluripotent Stem Cells termed as XPSCs have been derived from mice, horses, and humans by modulating growth factors and signalling pathways. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Stem cell treatment results in selective cognitive improvement in highly active multiple sclerosis

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) if well-timed and performed can result in selective cognitive improvement in highly active multiple sclerosis patients according to a clinical study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Restoring eyesight using chemokines to attract transplanted stem cells

AChemokines released from the degenerating retinae helped attract transplanted stem cells to improve cell therapy-based regenerative approaches.. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Human TFome - a comprehensive library of human transcription factors for cell reprogramming

To understand the reprogramming landscape mediated by transcription factors (TFs), researchers have prepared a comprehensive library called Human TFome which will help to direct the fate of Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Early driving events of human B cell reprogramming studied

When murine embryonic stem cells were fused with EBV-transformed human B cell lymphocytes it led to the formation of bi-species heterokaryons with multipotent stem cell characteristics and this helps to study events governing human B cell reprogramming. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Study show liver model from genetic engineered stem cells

Engineering of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) in Pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived multilineage human liver organoids has helped create models which recapitulate native tissue. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Stem cell transplant proves effective in older patients with pre-cancerous condition

A multi-centre clinical trial of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has shown to result in better outcome in aged patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. CRISPR Gene Activation Screens to decipher neuronal cell fate

High-throughput pooled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) screens have been employed to systematically map human neuronal cell fate which help to improve neuronal differentiation methods. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Fat metabolism controls stem cell differentiation – says study

Recent research has shown that lipid metabolism is required for mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation and organ maintenance in flatworms. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Did you know that a group of neurons known as "time cells" exist in the brain's hippocampus which are responsible for how the brain recalls the right place and right time? Study of these cells will help to develop treatments for memory loss.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 8 December 2020. Science, 2020; 370 (6513): 247 and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2020; 117 (45): 28463

2. An evolutionary genetic mutation unique to humans in a gene called the SIGLEC12 has been found to be the reason behind high risk of developing advanced cancer in some individuals..     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 9 December 2020 and FASEB BioAdvances, 08 December 2020

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