CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Nerve stem cells decrease during aging

A study on neural stem cells (NSCs) has identified that these cells are vulnerable to asynchronous decline due to aging and this is particularly more prominent in quiescent NSCs. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Test SARS-CoV-2 drugs on gut using stem cell-derived organoids

Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids (HIOs) have been developed which can be used as valuable tools to study SARS-CoV-2 and other enteric viruses. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Young environment – a pre-requisite for younger stem cells

Research has found that the youthful function of rejuvenated hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) after transplantation depends on whether the environment is young. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Stromal vascular fraction for diabetic foot ulcers

Local injections of autologous adipose‐derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells has helped to treat nonhealing Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in a clinical study Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Study throws insights on neural stem cell activation

Pharmacological manipulations combined with dynamic imaging of Neural stem cell (NSC) populations in their in vivo niche has given an insight on how their fate decisions are coordinated. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Epigenetics to modulate regenerative therapies for muscle disease

Epigenetic mechanisms have been identified which can be used to trigger and accelerate muscle cell growth at different stages of stem cell differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Discovery on key DNA methylation regulator in embryonic stem cells

A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen in human embryonic stem cells has helped to identify a key DNA methylation regulator QSER1 and this study will help in analysing gene regulation during development and epigenetic dysregulation in disease. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Selective expansion of muscle stem cells in situ achieved using small molecules

Pax7+ muscle stem cells could be selectively expanded in vitro and in situ using a combination of small molecules and transplanted dermal fibroblasts or skeletal muscle stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Human iPSC injected into monkey embryos to form chimeric embryos

Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been injected into cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) embryos cultured ex vivo and the results showed that the hEPSCs survived, proliferated, and generated several peri- and early post-implantation cell lineages inside monkey embryos. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Skin cells better than bone marrow to treat deadly skin disease

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the skin producing the ABCB5 protein outperformed those derived from bone marrow in homing to and local immunomodulation of wounds associated with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during adolescence may impair learning and memory during adulthood, especially by causing elevated levels of a bacteria called Parabacteroides in the gut microbiome.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 31 March 2021 and Translational Psychiatry, 2021; 11 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41398-021-01309-7

2. When the gene expression in fresh brain tissue after death was analysed, scientists have found that gene expression in some cells actually increased after death. These genes termed "Zombie genes" are mostly associated with inflammatory cells called glial cells..    
-Source: ScienceDaily, 23 March 2021 and Scientific Reports, 2021; 11 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-85801-6

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