CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Stem cells in space proliferate more efficiently than on earth

Mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown in a specially designed bioreactor in a space craft were found to differentiate and develop "significantly quicker in space" compared to control cells on Earth. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Blood stem cell transplant patients cures patients of HIV

Allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation from donors with CCR5 mutation has helped two patients with HIV who also had cancer free of HIV after the transplant. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Kidney tubules from stem cells grown in lab

Researchers have been able to grow kidney tubules from human kidney adult stem cells in microfluidic chips which will be useful for personalized disease modelling. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Scientists find ways to rejuvenate stem cells in aged brains

A study has uncovered that there is a decline in stem cells as brain ages and the stem cells are kept dormant to prevent full depletion. This is why they are resistant to regeneration as age increases. However, when activated properly, both young and old neural stem cells have same proliferation and differentiation capacity. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Gene behind bone differentiation identified

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoblasts through a tightly regulated multistep process in which researchers have described a novel transcription factor called osteoblast inducer (ObI)-1 as the key factor behind the process. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Small molecule compound kills brain cancer stem cell

A novel compound called RIPGBM has been identified which could induce cell death in multipotent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer stem cells (CSCs). . Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Human iPSCs help in cardiac drug discovery

Human iPSC derived cardiomyocytes were used for idenifying drugs that can block a protein called MAP4K4 to promote cardiomyocyte survival and function. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Gene regulator of brain cells discovered

Foxg1 gene, which is already known to involved in numerous processes of brain development has now been identified to play a fundamental role in piloting the differentiation of brain stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Novel biosensor to isolate and target leukemic stem cells

Researchers have reported a novel molecular sensor composed of a stem cell active enhancer fused with a fluorescence gene that labels the cells in which the enhancer is active, as these enhancer regions are a characteristic of cancer stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Study offers insight into pancreatic progenitor cell fate

A study has shown that fates of cells are not predetermined, but rather determined by the particular niche at their final destination. In that study Cells with high expression of a signalling protein called P120ctn emain in the central part of the pancreas, while cells with low expression of P120ctn migrate toward the peripheral part of the pancreas. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Sleep is essential for nuclear maintenance. Yes, using 3D time-lapse imaging techniques, it has been discovered in live zebrafish that single neurons require sleep in order to perform nuclear maintenance and lack of sleep results in DNA damage.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 5 March 2019 and Nature Communications, 2019; 10 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08806-w

2. Scientists have discovered the long elusive taste centre of the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and novel method of statistical analysis, a specific portion of the insular cortex in the brain hidden behind the neocortex has been found to represents distinct tastes.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 14 March 2019 and Nature Communications, 2019; 10 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08857-z

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