CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. To form placenta or baby? Embryonic stem cell fate determined by two proteins

Research has shown that HIPPO signaling resolves the embryonic cell fate conflicts during establishment of pluripotency in vivo. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Stem cell Clinical trial halts disease progression in multiple sclerosis patients

A clinical trial on Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) with BEAM chemotherapy has halted disease progression in patients with active, treatment refractory MS. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Honeybee's royal jelly hold the key to pluripotency

A study has shown that the protein Royalactin in royal jelly can maintain pluripotency by activating a ground-state pluripotency-like gene network in embryonic stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Protein complex that maintains Indefinite potential of stem cells identified

Scientists have discovered a new protein complex known as non-canonical BRD9-containing BAF chromatin remodeling complex that keeps the brakes on stem cells, allowing them to maintain their indefinite potential.Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Researcher report reprogramming of skin cells into functional blood stem cells

By using a combination of the three proteins that had earlier been used to successfully convert the mouse skin cells into blood stem cells, researchers have now been able to activate the genes that make human skin cells reprogram into blood stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Molecular mechanisms underlying autism uncovered in stem cell study

Researchers have examined molecular mechanisms leading to disturbed neuronal network function in autistic spectrum disorders by utilising patient-specific neuronal progenitors derived from skin cells or blood cells. They observed functional changes in the voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in fragile X syndrome (FraX) which was the disease model used in the study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. 'Cell-by-cell' map proves heart has no stem cells

A 'cell-by-cell' map of all dividing cardiac cells before and after a myocardial infarction using advanced molecular and genetic technologies has established that though many types of cells divide upon damage of the heart, none of them are capable of generating new heart muscle. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Fruit extracts may boost the ability of stem cells taken from ALS patients

A natural compound found in certain fruits and vegetables, called resveratrol, has been observed to help boost the ability of mesenchymal stem cells taken from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients to transform into mature nerve cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Protein down-regulation drives blood stem cell aging

The cohesin complex – a DNA clamp-holder which plays an important role in blood stem cell response to inflammation appears to drive key features of hematopoietic aging as per a new study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Muscle stem cell line to study muscle disorders developed in lab

Scientists have engineered a novel human stem cell line for skeletal muscle and in order to improve the formation of the muscle from stem cells, they screened several bioactive compounds. They were also able to observe the muscle stem cell activity by tagging the cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. By studying hundreds of years of family trees, science suggests that it is the man's genes which play a role in him having sons or daughters. This means that a man with many brothers is more likely to have sons, while a man with many sisters is more likely to have daughters.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 12 December 2008 & Evolutionary Biology, Dec 11, 2008; DOI: 10.1007/s11692-008-9046-3

2. Scientists have uncovered a gene called PLEKHG6 gene which has qualities that drives aspects of brain development which sets primates apart from other mammals.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 6 December 2018.

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