CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Stem cell molecular radar for detecting cancer

Scientists have detected the process of "copy editing" by a stem cell enzyme called ADAR1 and since this process is active in more than 20 tumor types, this may serve as molecular radar for early detection of malignancies. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. iPS derived neurons throws insight into Autism spectrum disorder

When stem cells created from individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were compared against stem cells created from those without ASD, scientists were able to measure differences in the patterns and speed of development in the ASD-derived cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Autologous blood stem cell transplant proves effective for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

BA Phase II clinical trial in Australia has shown that treatment with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (aHSCT) n patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) for whom conventional immunosuppressive theories failed has led to a sustained decrease in disability and no clinical relapses. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Restoring cell signalling pathway for faster healing of diabetic wounds

By using stem cells which can restore a cell signaling pathway called Nrf2/Keap1, the wound healing time decreased to 21 days in treated diabetic mice compared with 32 days in untreated diabetic mice.Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Review reveals underutilized Second Autologous stem cell Transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma

A review has revealed that Salvage second autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (SAT) in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma is not used to its fullest potential due to heterogeneous conditioning regimens, various intervals between transplants, and inconsistent post-transplantation maintenance therapies. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Ultrasoft electronics to monitor beating heart cells in lab

Ultrasoft electronics with nanomeshes have been used to monitor the field potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on a hydrogel while growing in culture. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Gene editing in mice with muscular dystrophy - Study identifies barriers

Adeno-associated virus–mediated (AAV-mediated) CRISPR editing has restored skeletal muscle function in a mice model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) but when they probed why cardiac hemodynamics was not improved, it was found that gRNA vector loss is the barrier. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. New target for cancer immune therapy identified

A study has identified that integrin CD11b which belongs to the family of adhesion receptors is a negative regulator of immune suppression and hence can serve as a target for cancer immune therapy. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Tissue resident memory T cells crucial for maintaining melanoma-immune equilibrium

Tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells (TRM cells) confined to the epidermal layer of the skin have been found to actively be involved in surveillance of subclinical melanomas in the skin by maintaining the cancer–immune equilibrium. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Prior radio/chemotherapy affects transplanted stem cells - shows study

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplanted in the form of bone marrow transplantation are found to be affected by pre-treatment regiments of irradiation and antagonistic antibody treatment as per a new study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Did you know that bees can count? Yes. Research has shown that Bees with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains can actually solve seemingly clever counting tasks.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 21 December 2018 and iScience, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/j.isci.2018.12.009

2. Scientific results suggest that mothers may pass on personality traits and relationship skills which will influence their children's likelihood of forming stable relationships.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 13 November 2018 and PLOS ONE, 2018; 13 (11): e0205732 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205732

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