CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Small molecule that could reverse disease signs in stem cells from Parkinson disease patients identified

A team of scientists have identified a small molecule compound that could reverse some of the toxicity in the brain cells created from Parkinson's disease patients' skin cells. Earlier the compound was tested in yeast cells which were engineered to overproduce alpha-synuclein, a protein that forms toxic clumps in the brain of Parkinson's patients, with positive outcome. Click to read more...

2. New encapsulation methodology to optimize stem cell transplantation for cardiac disease

A new procedure has been described in a recent work that encapsulates stem cells in alginate and these encapsulated cells after transplantation in heart of mice were retained for a longer time in the area of the lesion and improved the healing process of the heart muscle. Click to read more...

3. Fat stem cells can be converted to liver cells for use in liver regeneration –reports new study

Fat cells isolated from human liposuction aspirates have been converted to Hepatocytes (liver cells) using a spherical culture method by Stanford scientists and these hepatocytes survived well inside mice and helped in regeneration of new liver cells inside these mice without any evidence of tumour formation as usually observed in liver cells created from induced pluripotent or embryonic stem cells.Click to read more...

4. Gene correction in nerve cells created from iPS of ALS patients accomplished

An innovative stem cell technique has helped to create neurons from skin cells of patients with Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS) and when two small segments of genetic material called antisense oligonucleotides were used, the genetic defect in these nerve cells could be corrected, reported a study.Click to read more...

5. Self renewal of embryonic and epiblast stem cells explored

Two new studies have explored signaling pathways like the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and transcription factors like Tfcp2l1 that could help embryonic stem cells and epiblast stem cells be propagated in a more efficient manner. Click to read more...

6. New source of stem cells from the gut helps in repairing Inflammatory bowel diseases in mice model

Researchers have identified a new source of stem cells from the gut which when transplanted into mice with a form of inflammatory bowel disease integrated to the damaged areas of the mouse intestine and helped with the repair. Click to read more...

7. Gene inactivation can help in treatment of Atherosclerosis – identifies study

Scientists from Spain have identified that gene inactivation of a particular protein called Rcan1 in mice can reduces the burden of atherosclerosis. Click to read more...

8. Physical cues improve reprogramming efficiency of fibroblasts

Fibroblasts taken from human skin and mouse ears when grown on surfaces with parallel grooves in a cocktail used for reprogramming, scientists found that there was a four-fold increase in the number of cells that reprogrammed to a pluripotent state compared to those cells grown on a flat surface. Click to read more...

9. Nanosheet used for transplantation of corneal endothelial precursors on to the cornea of a bulls'eye

Using a nano-composite gel sheet developed in Japan, scientists from India have successfully transplanted lab grown corneal endothelial precursor cells to a bull's eye in a simple and reproducible methodology which has potential for clinical translation. Click to read more...

10. Intranasal stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Intranasal stem cell transplantation has shown to improve motor function and slow the neurological deterioration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Click to read more..

Really???

1. Did you know why the first cloned sheep was named Dolly? The sheep was named Dolly in memory of Dolly Parton, American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actress, author, and philanthropist. According to the words of Ian Wilmut who was a part of the team that cloned Dolly "Dolly is derived from a mammary gland cell and we couldn't think of a more impressive pair of glands than Dolly Parton's" (Source Wikipedia).

2. Are you aware of the first successful cord blood transplant in the world? It was performed, by Dr. Eliane Gluckman of St. Louis Hospital, Paris, France on a five-year-old boy, with Fanconi's Anemia. The cord blood was collected from the boy's sibling at birth and was stored by Dr. Broxmeyer.

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