CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Special stem cell bio-ink developed for printing bone and cartilage

A novel stem cell-containing bioink has been developed which can be employed in a 3D printing process to engineer bone and cartilage tissues. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Neurons coupled with cardiac tissues to make them beat in vitro

Sympathetic nerve cells have been created in the lab from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and these nerve cells when grown along with heart muscle cells were able to enhance contractions in the heart muscle cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Functional pituitary cells developed from pluripotent stem cells in lab

Scientists have developed a clinically relevant protocol to derive anterior pituitary cells from human pluripotent stem cells which were able to secrete multiple hormones in response to different stimuli. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Relationships between intestinal stem cells studied using molecular labelling technology

Use of molecular labelling and single-cell gene expression analyses has helped understand that the label retaining cells in the intestine and reserve intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are two different cell populations. These two cell populations were earlier believed to be the same. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Clinical trial on HSCT for multiple sclerosis offers hope

Long term follow-up of a clinical trial on autologous blood stem-cell transplantation for multiple myeloma has revealed sustained improvement in 35% of the patients. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Stem cells employ different method of vessel exit – says study

Employing novel techniques, researchers have discovered that therapeutic stem cells exit the bloodstream in a different manner from white blood cells, by remaining passive while the vascular wall undergoes extensive remodelling to allow these stem cells to exit the lumen. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Novel method to enhance muscle stem cell efficiency reported

Scientists have employed leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) to maintain the undifferentiated state of muscle stem cells in vitro and enhance their transplantation efficiency. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication

8. Skin cells from diabetic foot ulcers turned to iPS

Skin cells from diabetic foot ulcers have been reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using Sendai virus and these iPS cells could be used to treat chronic wounds in the future. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Impaired muscle stem cell response in burns and its effects

A study of muscle biopsies from burn patients has revealed that there is robust muscle atrophy after burns and the activation and apoptosis of muscle stem cells impacts the recovery of tissue in the patients. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Stem cell trial for ALS patients proves safety

Transplantation of human stem cells in the spinal cord of 15 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in escalating doses has shown that the procedure is safe. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1.Did you know that chronic fatigue syndrome earlier attributed to psychological factors has now been identified to have an association with the changes in gut bacterial microbiome but it is not still evident if the altered gut microbiome is a cause or consequence of the disease?.    
 --Source:ScienceDaily, 27 June 2016 & Microbiome, 2016; 4 (1)

2. Are you aware of the fact that it is in your genes for you to be nice or nasty? Yes, a new mathematical framework on social behavior which uses genotype at a polymorphic locus as a statistical predictor has helped explore why some individuals are genetically programmed to be nice while others stay nasty.    
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 24 June 2016 & PLOS Computational Biology, 2016; 12 (6): e1005006

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