CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Study provides evidence towards existence of cancer stem cells in myelodysplastic syndromes

Using gene tracking tools, scientists have identified a rare subset of cancer stem cells in myelodysplastic syndrome which have the ability to replenish themselves and other cancer cells. Click to read more...

2. Modified human fat tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells for treating brain tumours

Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human fat tissue were modified to secrete bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) by manipulating them in the laboratory. Later, these manipulated cells were injected to glioblastoma mice model and the results showed that the tumours in these mice had less growth and were less aggressive. Click to read more...

3. Stem cells loaded with cancer killing viruses for treating brain tumours

Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) scientists have injected encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells loaded with oncolytic herpes virus for treating brain tumours in mice model. The mice which received the encapsulated stem cells had a higher survival rate. Click to read more...

4. Mechanisms underlying smooth muscle cell damage leading to heart disease in Progeria, identified

Researchers from University of Maryland have elucidated the molecular pathway underlying the occurrence of heart disease in progeria patients. They found that high levels of a toxic protein called progerin and low levels of PARP-1, a protein involved in repairing cell damage in the cells of progeria patients leads to faulty DNA repair in these cells resulting in a mitotic catastrophe. This causes eventual destruction of the smooth muscle tissues making the arteries vulnerable to damage finally culminating in heart disease in these patients.Click to read more...

5. Autologous Induced Pluripotent stem cells used for creating new bone in monkeys

Researchers have reported that autologous induced pluripotent stem cells from rhesus macaque monkey have been converted into bone progenitors and these progenitors helped in new bone formation without teratoma formation. Click to read more...

6. Research on regeneration of nerve using cord blood derived stem cells proves successful

Umbilical cord derived Mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to be of help in the regeneration of nerves, observed by positive effects in functional and morphologic recovery in a rat sciatic nerve injury. Click to read more...

7. Mature functional nerve cells derived from stem cells

Scientists from Britain have derived functional nerve cells from skin cells using transcription factors and the fact that these cells were more mature make them useful as models for diseases like Alzheimer's. Click to read more...

8. Blocking cell-recruiting signals reduces the metastasis of triple negative breast cancer in a mice model - reports study

In a recent study, blocking the cell-recruiting signals using genetic engineering in triple negative breast cancer cells and implanting them into female mice with breast cancer resulted in reduced rate of metastasis. Click to read more...

9. Interaction of Transcription factors with 'hotspots' in cell's genome regulates development of fat cells

It has been discovered that during early adipogenesis or fat cell generation, from stem cells a complex interplay between transcription factors takes place at specific locations in the genome called 'hotspots' and this process in turn controls the activation of the right genes needed for fat cell development. Click to read more...

10. Study offers insights on genetic and epigenetic changes taking place in sperms in its journey towards totipotency

A study done in the University of Utah on sperm precursor cells reported that these precursors have embedded within them, the potential to become totipotent but due to presence of methylation tags the genes for totipotency remain silent. Since these sperm precursors already possess the totipotency genes, it is easy for them to contribute to the totipotecy of the Zygote immediately after fertilization. Click to read more...

10. 'Alert' state of quiescence in stem cells deciphered

While studying the response of muscle stem, a new phase of stem cells in the cell cycle has been identified in which the stem cells stay in an alert state to respond to tissue damage but stay without committing themselves to unnecessary cell divisions. Click to read more...

Really???

1. Did you know why the Drosophila Melanogaster (the fruit fly) is a favourite in research? It is because, they can be easily reared in the laboratory, their short life cycles helps produce generations every two weeks and the presence of large populations help in statistical analysis. Other advantages include that the embryo grows outside the body making it to be easily studied, the blastoderm stage in fruit fly embryo is a syncytium consisting of thousands of nuclei making the macromolecules like DNA when injected reach all the nuclei and the genome being small, mutations can be targeted to specific genes.(Sources: http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/D/Drosophila.html, http://eol.org/pages/733739/details and http://www.thebugsquad.com/fruit-flies/drosophila-melanogaster/)

2. Are you aware of the first organisms in each of the divisions of the Eukaryotes, whose nuclear and organelle genomes were sequenced? In Protista (primitive organisms) it was that of the Guillardia theta in 2001; in Plants, Arabidopsis thaliana (a wild type of mustard plant) in 2000; in Fungi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the year 1996 and in animals it was the Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living, transparent nematode in 1998. The human genome sequencing was completed in 2006.     (Source : Wikipedia)

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