CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Different iPS cells - different immune rejection fates

A study on humanized mouse model has revealed differential immune responses between induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell derived smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and iPS-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thus supporting the application of these RPE for macular degeneration. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Human cell dedifferentiation achieved under controlled in vitro conditions

Newts possess remarkable regeneration capabilities due to de-differentiation potential of their cells at times of injury. However human cells do not possess these properties. Researchers have grown human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) under in vitro conditions that recapitulate the conditions promoting regeneration as like in newts and have reported exciting findings. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. In vitro evaluation system for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) using human iPS cells developed

Scientists have developed an in vitro evaluation system using human induced pluripotent stem cells which recapitulate the early stage of the disease condition of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and can be used for DMD drug screening. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. First of its kind clinical trial on novel stem cell delivery method for cardiac failure shows success

A clinical trial on retrograde bone marrow cell delivery in patients with heart failure has proven that the cell injections are safe and improvement in the ejection fraction was observed in the patients of the treatment group. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Stem cell exosomes for wound healing

To unravel the mechanism of how mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) help in wound healing, scientists have studied the role of cell derived vesicles called exosomes from these MSCs. The results showed that the exosomes possibly act by enhancing the proliferation and migration of fibroblast cells and also by inducing development of new blood vessels. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. iPS derived kidney cell progenitors provide hope for acute kidney injury

Human induced pluripotent stem cells derived kidney progenitor cells have been demonstrated to be capable of forming three-dimensional kidney tubule-like structures in vitro and in vivo. Also these kidney progenitor cells were able to ameliorate Acute kidney injury (AKI) in mice after transplantation. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Safe process of conversion of Skin cells to neurons using small molecules demonstrated

Two independent research teams have been able to reprogram skin cells into neurons using a cocktail of chemicals alone. This approach will serve as an alternative to the use of transcription factors which carry technical challenges and have safety concerns. Click to read more... | Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Tumour cells can be reprogrammed to normal cells - suggests study

Tumour cells can be reprogrammed to become normal cells according to the discovery that cell adhesion proteins interact with the microprocessor which is a key player in the production of microRNAs (miRNAs). When cells come together, specific micro RNAS suppress genes that promote cell growth. This control being lost in cancer cells is connected to this microprocessor complex. Lab experiments have shown that when the levels of specific micro RNAs are restored, the cancer cells became capable of reversing uncontrolled cell growth. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Scientists use stem cells to create lab model to study muscular dystrophy

A novel technique has been reported which induces pluripotent stem cells to grow into long muscle fibers, capable of contracting in a dish and proliferating in large numbers. This technique will prove useful in the study of the origin of the pathological defects associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Critical mitochondrial switch during reprogramming in egg cells identified

A recent study shows that mitochondria are roadblocks to cellular reprogramming. By manipulating a gene called Tcl1 in oocytes or egg cells, scientists have been successful in suppressing mitochondria which in turn enhanced somatic cell reprogramming. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. We are aware that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is solely inherited from the mother in most organisms including humans but did you know how this occurs? This occurs by an inherent lesser number of mtDNA copies in the sperm which has an average of 5 molecules of mtDNA compared to an average of 200,000 mtDNA molecules in the egg and also by mechanisms like degradation of the sperm's mtDNA in the female genital tract or in the fertilised egg. Also in some organisms this occurs by failure of sperm mtDNA to enter the egg. In vitro fertilization techniques like injecting sperm into oocytes may interfere with the process of destruction of paternal copies of mtDNA.     
                                          - Source: Wikipedia and www.bradshawfoundation.com/journey/eve.html

2. Did you know of a gene called "cheapdate"? It is so named because mutations in this gene cause flies to be susceptible to alcohol. This gene's another name is "amnesiac" as mutations also cause memory impairment.    
                                          -Source:http://bitesizebio.com/23221/14-of-the-funniest-fruit-fly-gene-names/#Ref9

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