CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Genetic locus protecting blood stem cells from damage by reactive oxygen species discovered

A research focussed on imprinted genes (genes stamped based on inheritance) has identified that maternally inherited Dlk1-Gtl2 locus blocks mitochondrial metabolism in blood stem cells thus protecting these cells from damage by reactive oxygen species which are by-products of the mitochondrial metabolism. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Protein which maintains cancer stem cell quiescence to serve as new therapeutic target

A specific protein called PCL1 could serve as therapeutic target to eliminate cancer stem cells according to a new study. The PCL1 activates p53 protein which maintains the cancer stem cells in a quiescent state making these cells harder to target by conventional therapeutics. By blocking PCL1 it may be possible to make these cancer cells to leave the quiescent state for them to be targeted and eliminated. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. De novo Fat cell production from bone marrow stem cells explored

While fat cells inside the body were believed to be generated only from tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells, a research team has discovered the de novo fat cell production from bone marrow stem cells. This study also suggests that it might be the type of fat-storing cell produced rather than the amount of fat which might in turn determine the risk for diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, some cancers etc.. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Current dogma of blood stem cell production challenged by new discovery

A new study which employed a cell-sorting and mapping technique has shown that the process of blood stem cell production differs between fetal and adults. In adults the process becomes a "two-tier" hierarchy and this finding challenges the current dogma of blood stem cell production. This study will have profound implications in further unravelling the origins of blood cancer. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is also due to muscle stem cell dysfunction – says study

It has been identified that in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the muscle wasting is not only due to the defects in the muscle fibre but also is exacerbated by the inherent defects in the muscle stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Editing sperms - The best way to edit the genome

A team led by Dr.Li in order to edit a gene that causes eye cataracts in mice has edited the "spermatogonial" stem cells using CRISPR Technology and used these corrected sperms to form embryos. The researchers suggest that editing of these reproductive cells is certainly superior to editing the embryo directly. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Embryoid bodies grown by 3D printing

A 3-D printing method which extrudes embryonic stem cells into a hydrogel has been used to grow embryoid body (EB) in a highly controlled manner for the first time and this process has resulted in formation of uniform 'blocks' of embryonic stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Embryonic stem cells' regenerative potential reduced during space travel

A new study done by NASA in a space shuttle employing body (EB) model of tissue differentiation has shown that microgravity during space travel inhibited the human embryonic stem cells' ability to differentiate and generate most of the cell lineages. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Bacterial Protein + Small molecules combo to convert pluripotent stem cells to neurons

A protein found in E. coli bacteria known as Skp when combined with small molecules called neurodazine (Nz) and neurodazole (Nzl) has been shown to act synergistically to induce pluripotent cells to become functional neurons. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. New technique allows long term culture of liver cells in vitro

One of the challenges faced during human liver cell culture in vitro is the inability to expand these liver cells while maintaining their proliferative capacity and metabolic function. A new technique based on response of the liver cells to a protein called oncostatin M (OSM) has allowed in vitro expansion of the liver cells to 35 population doubling, resulting in nearly a quadrillion cells from a single human liver cell isolate. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Larger animals like the whale in spite of their massive body size have lesser risk of getting cancer compared to smaller animals. This lack of correlation between body mass and the risk of getting cancer is known as Peto's Paradox. This lower cancer risk in large animals has been attributed to factors like low level of free radicals produced in these animals due to lower metabolic rate, specially evolved cancer-fighting mechanisms in these animals, low reproductive rate and other cancer prevention mechanisms which need to be explored.     
 - Source: : http://www.nature.com/news/massive-animals-may-hold-secrets-of-cancer-suppression-1.12258

2. Did you know why cancer of the heart is rare? It is believed to be because of its lower exposure to external carcinogens and due to the fact that heart cells do not often replicate in adult humans.    
                                                   -Source:http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/there-are-many-kinds-of-c

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