CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Synthetic drug to stop cancer stem cell growth

A molecular targeted synthetic drug called WYC-209 has been developed which could inhibit the proliferation of stem cells of melanoma and lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Atlas of genes controlling pluripotency created

An atlas of essential and growth-restricting genes has been created by scientists using human pluripotent stem cells to understand important aspects of cellular essentiality. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Vitamin A derivative to prevent liver cancer

An acyclic retinoid (ACR) has been found to be an effective liver cancer prevention agent which targets an oncogene MYCN in liver cancer stem cells Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Cell-free regenerative therapy for the heart

An engineered hydrogel patch which is capable of slowly releasing extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted from heart cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells has promoted ejection-fraction recovery after myocardial infarction. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Fat tissue derived stem cells for treating the injured spinal cord

Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) combined with a fibrin matrix has been proven to create a positive impact on the functional and structural recovery after spinal cord injury in ratsClick to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Gene edited stem cells show promise in HIV therapy

Scientists have identified that CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) when transplanted persist in the host and contribute to reduction in viral load showing promise in therapy for AIDS. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Ebf3 maintains bone marrow stem cell niche- says study

A transcription factor known as early B-cell factor 3 (Ebf3) has been identified to be the key in maintaining bone marrow stem cell niche which does so by preventing bone formation inside the bone marrow to provide space for the stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Stem cell transplantation for Asherman's syndrome

Asherman's syndrome (AS) in which a woman's fertility is affected due to scar formation in the uterus or cervix may be amenable to Human endometrial mesenchymal stem cells (eMSC) therapy, as per a recent study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Cell fate tracking in Zebrafish offers valuable clues to skin regeneration

Cell fate tracking of the regenerative epidermis (RE) during zebrafish fin regeneration has shown how the cells contribute to the regeneration process and how a dynamic rearrangement of the epidermis occurs during and after regeneration. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Studying cancer cells cultured on specific scaffolds helps understand organ specific cancer metastasis

Culturing colorectal cancer cells on lung and liver decellularized scaffolds has helped to study how the cancer metastasis occurs in the lung and liver respectively. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. We might not be the first advanced species on the earth according to the Silurian hypothesis which states that an advanced industrial civilization might have existed on earth which would have been capable of having existed without leaving a trace that can be detected now. This hypothesis can be tested only if the geological footprint left by the previous civilizations can be somehow studied by novel methodologies which should be developed.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 16 April 2018 and International Journal of Astrobiology, 2018; 1

2. A rare example of natural selection in modern humans could have been the mechanism behind the large spleens in the Bajau people of Southeast Asia who are known as Sea Nomads. This study could help in providing relevant insights into how humans manage acute hypoxia.     
-Source: ScienceDaily, 19 April 2018 and Cell, 2018; 173 (3): 569

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