CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Muscle stem cells derived from pluripotent stem cells explored

A study has explored the myogenicity of skeletal muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs) directly differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). They also matured those SMPCs to create dystrophin-producing muscle fibers which they found were actually smaller than those found in real human muscle. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Oral mucosal stem cells and scaffolds bridge the injured spinal cord to recovery

Implantation of a tissue engineered 3D construct embedded with human oral mucosa stem cells (hOMSC) in a rat model with complete spinal cord injury has restored motor control, coordination and walking pattern in the rats. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Higher order structures of kidney created in the lab

Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been coaxed to form ureteric buds and progenitors of branched collecting ducts which has not been reported earlier and these cells have helped to form higher order kidney organoids that recapitulate the embryonic branching morphogenesis. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Study offers novel insights into ovarian cancer stem cell biology

"Ovarian stem cells" expressing germline pluripotent markers and ovarian cancer stem cells (CSC) have been studied in detail to understand the similarities between these two populations as this is essential to identify precise tumor-initiating CSC populations in the ovary. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. New molecular handle that keeps stem cells immature identified

A study that focused on a cluster of proteins called the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex has reported that the process of loading MCM complexes by a cell onto its chromosomes prepares it for cell division and speedy MCM loading is the process by which stem cells maintain themselves in the immature, stem cell state.Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Cell crowding directs stem cell fate – says study

By studying the cells of the skin, scientists have now shown that cell density and crowding influence single stem cell fate decisions and the movement of differentiating cells upwards within the tissue. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Infusing young stem cells reverse signs of aging in clinical trial

Clinical trials have demonstrated that a single infusion of mesenchymal stem cells from younger donors in aged adults were safe and resulted in improvement in many of their age related symptoms. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Behaviour pattern of muscle stem cells after injury studied

Clonal multicolor lineage tracing of skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs) has shown that these stem cells becomes less diverse, but their proliferative capacity is maintained during tissue repair after a sudden injury. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Novel harvesting method ensures Blood stem cells with high engrafting capacity

A rapid stem cell mobilization regimen before stem cell harvest for blood stem cell transplants has been developed which helps to preferentially mobilize stem cells that demonstrate a higher engraftment efficiency than those mobilized by the usual injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Repeated activation of mTOR can lead to stem cell loss - identifies study

Though stem cell proliferation during a regenerative episode requires transient activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling, repeated rounds of actiavtion can lead to stem cell loss which can be prevented by by pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of mTOR. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Actually avenging anti-social behaviour gives pleasure according to a new study which has explored the motivation for this in human children and chimpanzees. Six year old children and chimpanzees were found to have the want to avenge antisocial behaviour with an urge to watch it and the study has concluded that such an act is a crucial characteristic to manage living in a community.
 -Source: ScienceDaily, 19 December 2017 and Nature Human Behaviour, 2017

2. A sugar gene called CMAH that allows for the synthesis of a sugar called Neu5Gc was at some point lost in humans during evolution and scientists have now found that the loss of this gene protected humans from some pathogens that affect other primates but also that consuming red meats, some fish and dairy products which contain this gene can cause inflammation, arthritis, and cancer.      -Source: ScienceDaily, 13 December 2017 and Genome Biology and Evolution, December 2017

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