CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Accumulated mitochondrial mutations impair clinical utility of iPS cells

Researchers have reported that iPS cells derived from an older patient are more likely to carry genetic mutations that have accumulated in the mitochondria of the parent adult cell used for generating the iPS cells and these mutations could affect the iPS cells' function. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Chemically defined forward programming for mass production of platelets

A forward programming strategy in GMP compliant chemically defined conditions using three transcription factors can help in mass generation of functional platelets even from a limited quantity of starting cells, as per a new report. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Congenital Cytomegalovirus infection impairs differentiation of neuronal stem cells –reports study

Congenital infection by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can lead to permanent abnormalities of the central nervous system. To know how it occurs, researchers have studied the outcome of infection on a transcription factor critical in the developing brain. The results showed that the CMV infection HCMV dramatically increased the transcription factor levels and activity which in turn reduced the rate of neurons generated by the neuronal stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Stem cell derived microvesicles to protect brain from radiation injury

Transplanting neural stem cell derived microvesicles into brain of rats has helped reverse or prevent radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Induced multipotent stem(iMS) cells – A new hope for tissue regeneration

Based on the mechanism behind salamander's limb regeneration, scientists have generated tissue-regenerative multipotent stem cells (iMS cells) from mature bone and fat cells which in contrast to mesenchymal stem cells, could promote repair in a tissue dependent manner without forming tumours. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Multi-cellular therapy leads to positive outcome in heart failure patients

A randomized clinical trial on infusion of combination of selectively expanded bone marrow mononuclear cells and macrophages has led to 37 per cent lower rate of death and hospitalization in patients with heart failure due to ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Rat Spinal cord 'replacement' with human neural stem cells regenerates corticospinal tract (CST)

Transplantation of grafts of human neural stem cells in spinal cord injured rats has resulted in regeneration of a specialized band of spinal chord nerve fibres known as the corticospinal tract (CST) Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication

8. Cancer stem cell's secreted molecules induce neighbour's metastasis- shows study

A research has shown that breast cancer stem cells secrete transcription factors which make neighboring cells to metastasize and this process involves the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Antibody therapy against myeloma cells shows promise

An antibody called Medi-551 which targets a specific protein called CD19 on the surface of multiple myeloma's cancer stem cells when therapeutically applied in 15 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma has shown that the number of cancer stem cells decreased by half in 14 out of the 15 patients. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Gene helps create functional beta cells from stem cells

An animal study has shown a gene—called estrogen-related receptor gamma needs to be switched on for maturation of Beta cells from stem cells. These mature functional beta cells can then sense glucose levels and release insulin. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Did you know that each individual has a unique 'Brainprint' similar to a fingerprint? A team of researchers has recorded the neuronal signals of brain activity of 50 people using electroencephalogram headsets, by recording of each individual's brain activity during their viewing a series of 500 images designed specifically to elicit unique response. The results revealed a unique 'Brainprint' for each person which was really accurate in identifying the person by just looking at it. However, unlike fingerprints which are unique and permanent, brainprints can be reset.    
 --Source: Science Daily and IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, 2016; 11 (7): 1618

2. Memory suppressor genes are a keen focus of research as it is fascinating to imagine how the brain filters and suppresses selective memories. Now, a gene named 'DmSLC22A' has been shown to be an important memory suppressor gene in Drosophila. When this gene was disabled, the flies had two-fold better memory. This research could be useful in identifying treatments for Alzhemier's disease and other disorders which manifest memory loss.    
-Source: Science Daily and Neuron, April 2016

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