CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Functional Lung cells successfully generated from human stem cells

Human stem cells have been successfully converted into functional lung cells by a team from Columbia University Medical Center and this would help in growing bioengineered lungs from human stem cells in the future. Click to read more...

2. Research on prostate cancer reveals clues on new therapeutic targets: Luminal and Basal stem cells

It has now been identified that stem cells in the prostate cancer evolve as the disease progresses. Though prostate cancer is believed to originate from a type of stem cell called basal stem cell, as the disease progresses, the cancer begins to grow from a different type of cell called a luminal stem cell. This discovery has thrown clues for newer therapeutic targets to combat prostate cancer. Click to read more...

3. Novel method to grow intestinal stem cells in large quantities identified

A recent study has suggested that it is now possible to grow unlimited quantities of intestinal stem cells in the lab by employing two small molecules that helps to maintain stem cells in their undifferentiated state and promote their proliferation.Click to read more...

4. Disarming the gene that drives self-renewal in colon cancer stem cells, an effective approach to treat colon cancer- says study

A team of researchers led by Dr. John Dick have identified that the gene BMI-1 is a pivotal regulator of colon cancer stem cells and they have been able to successfully block BMI-1 using a small molecule inhibitor. This study will pave way for novel therapies for colon cancer.Click to read more...

5. Human embryonic stem cells successfully converted into blastocyst like cells.

Researchers at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) have been able to convert human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to a cell state that resembles cells found in the human blastocyst. This novel cell state will help overcome certain obstacles limiting potential of pluripotent cells in regenerative medicine. Click to read more...

6. Three critical roles of LRIG1 in intestinal physiology deciphered

A detailed literature review and mining of published dataset by Dr Yang Wang and colleagues from Vanderbilt University has helped them to describe the three interrelated roles of LRIG1 in the intestinal physiology as a tumor suppressor, Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) negative regulator, and a stem cell marker. Click to read more...

7. Randomly oriented nano-fibers provide more favorable surface for growth of mesenchymal stem cells - suggests study

A study which compared the growth of human mesenchymal stem cells on two kinds of nano-fibre surfaces, one in which nano-fibres were oriented randomly and the other in which nanofibres were electrospun into a special pattern has concluded that randomly oriented fibres promoted better cell adhesion and viability. Click to read more...

8. Reactivating microglia can help treat Gliomas

Specialized immune cells called microglia found in the brain have been found to able to arrest the growth of the Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) which give rise to gliomas and a drug which reactivates microglia has also been shown to reduce glioma growth in mice. Thus reactivating the microglias might be a novel therapeutic strategy for these deadly brain tumors. Click to read more...

9. Neurons derived from skin cells of Alzheimer's disease serve as valuable tools for drug testing

Nerve cells created using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) technology from patients with familial form of Alzheimer's Disease, when used for testing of drugs, earlier proven to be beneficial to treat Alzheimer's Disease, showed that these drugs actually failed to produce any beneficial effects. Thus iPS technology could be harnessed for drug screening. Click to read more...

10. Success of Cardiac stem cell grafts enhanced by priming the cells in a novel cocktail – proves study

A study has proven that when cardiac stem cells are cultured in a cocktail containing Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) and the hormone insulin and then injected sub-epicardially, their grafting efficiency is enhanced. Click to read more..

Really???

1. Have you heard about The X-shaped RNA nanoparticles? They are RNA nanoparticlees created by researchers from the University of Kentucky with four arms which are capable of attaching to four different active therapeutic RNA motifs; For eg. siRNA (for gene silencing), aptamer (for targeting) and ribozyme (as catalyst) etc, each retaining their biological and structural function independently . These X-shaped RNA molecules are chemically and thermodynamically stable with ability to remain intact in the cancer tissue inside mice for more than 8 hours and they also possess ability to resist the degradation by RNAse ( Ref: Nano Today. 2012 Aug;7(4):245-257).

2. Are you aware of the first complete genome of a free-living organism to be sequenced and published? It is that of the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae Rd whose circular chromosome contains 1,830,137 base pairs and its publication marked the first published use of whole-genome shotgun sequencing, eliminating the need for initial mapping efforts (Ref: Science 1995; 269 (5223): 496-512)

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