CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Epigenome of major human organs mapped

Scientists have constructed epigenome maps of different human organs from individual donors which will be useful to study the role of epigenetics in development, health and disease. In addition to several surprising findings, the epigenome mapping also showed that DNA methylation patterns varied between the organs. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Discarded human kidneys to be recycled to engineer tailor-made replacement kidneys

With an aim to use discarded kidneys as templates after removing their cells for bioengineering human kidneys for transplantation, researchers have performed two studies, one of which has evaluated the effect of the cell removal process on the structures in the kidney while the other has reported the interactions that occur when stem cells are placed on the kidneys which have been through the cell removal process. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal| Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Cell therapy reduces amount of therapeutic interventions after traumatic brain injury in children – reveals study

A clinical study has demonstrated that children who suffered traumatic brain injury when injected with autologous bone marrow stem cells had reduced intensity of therapeutic interventions for managing elevated intracranial pressure compared to children who did not receive stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Myxoma virus to aid bone marrow transplant

Graft versus Host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogenic stem cell transplants. Scientists have serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus when delivered by infected activated human T lymphocytes to the tumour had the ability to prevent GVHD and also was able to exert an anti-cancer effect. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Turning back the clock –resetting the age possible using induced pluripotent stem cells

A recent review has explained the strategies to model late onset diseases by mimicking age-related changes in cells using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). According to the review, the ability to program and reprogram cellular age will help in studying cellular rejuvenation in real time. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. New stem cell population linked to cancer identified in the colon

A previously unknown population of long-lived radiation-resistant stem cells has been identified in the colon. These stem cells have been found to express keratin-19 (Krt19) and these stem cells have been linked to colon cancer growth and progression. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Novel cell based assay helps create in vitro 3D breast tissue models

An organoid based assay has been developed in which cultured human breast epithelial cells help rebuild the three-dimensional tissue architecture of the breast tissue. This in vitro model will be useful to quantify cells with regenerative potential and will also help to study cell interactions with the physical environment at different stages of development. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Therapeutic approach that promotes development of bone forming cells reported

A drug that blocks a protein called PPARy has shown to induce osteogenesis or bone formation from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Pluripotent stem cell based system helps model neuronal connectivity in the laboratory

A recent study has reported the successful culture of neurons from two different brain structures, neocortical and mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from a single pluripotent stem cell line and establishment of connections between the two types of neurons in vitro in a single culture vessel. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Avocado compound can selectively kill leukemia stem cells – reveals study

A high-throughput cell-based screen has been used to assess the effects of avocatin B, a compound from the Avocado fruit on human leukemia stem cells and the results showed that the compound was able to selectively destroy the leukemia stem cells leaving healthy blood cells unaffected. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Did you know that the society we live in shapes the complexity of our brain ? This is based on the "distributed cognition hypothesis" which says that insects which live as a colony make less individual brain investment, i.e solitary species of insects had larger brains than social species. Brain regions for central cognitive processing in these insects shrank with evolution of social behaviour. This findings in the insects is in contrast to the pattern of brain increase with increase in social behaviour as seen in vertebrates including humans.     
 - Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150616215956.htm

2. Did you know that scientists have found a biological link between chronic stress and shorter lifespan? Yes, researchers have found the link to be a hormone called "Klotho" which regulates aging and lifespan. A study was done on women and the results showed that women who were chronically stressed out had lower levels of Klotho compared to women who experienced normal levels of stress. The study hypothesizes that chronic stress may actually cause women to age prematurely.    
  - Source: Translational Psychiatry (2015) 5, e585;

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