CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Faulty gene causing normal cells to behave like cancer stem cells leads to bowel cancer's treatment resistance

Researchers have discovered that a faulty gene causes normal cells to behave like cancer stem cells in bowel cancer and they go on to replace those cancer stem cells which are killed by chemotherapy. This can explain why bowel cancer becomes resistant to treatment. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Link between Estrogens, blood stem cells and Tamoxifen explored

A recent study has shown that a cancer treatment drug Tamoxifen can block the progression of specific blood related cancers by its action on the female hormone estrogen which in turns produces the effect by acting on blood stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Study on mitochondria in breast cancer stem cells identifies a new therapeutic target for cancer

The role of mitochondria in cancer development by fuelling cancer stem cells has been uncovered by a recent study on breast cancer stem cells which suggests that by targeting mitochondria, new cancer treatments can be developed. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. A specific mRNA modification controls fate of embryonic stem cells

A team of scientists have discovered a new mechanism of RNA regulation in embryonic stem cells in which a specific chemical modification "tag," called m6A on RNA plays a key role in maintaining the embryonic stem cells in an undifferentiated state. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Mesenchymal stem cells expressing a gene called Gli1 are key players in organ fibrosis – report researchers

It has been identified that there are a group of cells located around the blood vessels which express a gene called Gli1 and these are the ones which are responsible for fibrosis of organs due to aging or in response to injury. In fibrotic disease, when these cells were destroyed, the organ function could be restored. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Synthetic fossilization of biological cells and tissues to preserve structure accomplished

A team of researchers have used a silica based method to "fix" small biological entities like red blood cells in order to strengthen their cellular structure to become biomimetic composite materials which can be used in a variety of studies in the future. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal| Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Genome editing of sperm-producing adult stem cells possible – proves study

By using specially designed enzymes and other molecules, researchers have reported a gene editing technique in sperm-producing adult stem cells and this will be useful to avoid genetic defects when these sperm cells go on to produce the next generation. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. On – Off switch for key stem cell gene discovered

Biologists have discovered an on-off switch for the Sox2 gene which is a key player in maintaining embryonic stem cells. The switch was located at a region away from the position of Sox2 in the genome. Click to read more... |Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Study offers insights on link between metabolism and stem cell fate

It has been shown in a recent study that the nutrients used, ways by which they are used and how they are used can help a stem cell to determine its differentiation and this occurs by alteration of the chromatin landscape influencing gene expression. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Sleeping beauty gene based modified T cells successfully used in clinical trial for hematological malignancies

Researchers have reported the positive outcome observed in clinical studies that employed T cells modified using a non viral Sleeping Beauty gene based method in patients with advanced B-cell malignancies. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Are you aware that loss of Y chromosome in men has been linked to risk of increased cancer development? This is because Y chromosome plays a role in tumour suppression. Also smoking and Y chromosomal loss is dose dependant i.e. increased smoking causes increased Y chromosomal loss.
  - Source:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/286474.php

2. Did you know that the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in blood can predict the frailty and life span of a person? High levels of mtDNA correspond to nearly 2.1 extra years of life compared to people with the lowest levels of mtDNA. Since women have more mtDNA they tend to live longer than men.
               - Source: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-amount-mitochondrial-dna-frailty-mortality.html

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