CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Re-specified induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to create blood progenitors in large quantities – says study

A team of researchers from Boston Children's Hospital's Stem Cell Transplantation have reported a new approach for turning induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into blood progenitor by employing iPSCs that had already been directed to grow into blood progenitors instead of using skin or other fully differentiated cell types as used in routine approaches. Click to read more...

2. Cell signaling that triggers formation of a type of brain tumour in children explored

Craniopharyngioma, a pituitary tumour has now been identified to arise via a different mechanism from that occurs in other common tumours. By tracking the cells, it has been observed that the cells which acquired a genetic mutation send signals to induce changes in nearby cells which divide and form the tumour. Click to read more...

3. Modified stem cells serve as anti-inflammatory drug delivery vehicles

By inserting modified strands of RNA into mesenchymal stem cells, these stem cells have been used as drug delivery vehicles to target sites of inflammation and release the anti-inflammatory drug interleukin-10 in a mice study to reduce the inflammation.Click to read more...

4. Transplanted stem cells provide migratory cues for brain's own neurogenic cells to help repair injured brain tissue

In a recent study on how stem cells contribute to repair, it has been reported that the transplanted stem cells provide migratory cues for the brain's endogenous neurogenic cells, and these transplanted stem cells also act as a "biobridge" which then guide the endogenous neurogenic cells from their niche towards the injured brain tissue to contribute to repair.Click to read more...

5. Magnetic nanoparticles employed to isolate neural stem cells from rat brain

Extracting NSCs (neural stem cells) have now become easier and safer. Thanks to the method developed at the University of Oxford which used magnetic nanoparticlees coated with antibodies targeted at a surface protein of NSCs. When these nanoparticles were injected into the brain they bind to the NSCs which are then pulled by a magnetic field for easy isolation suing a syringe. Click to read more...

6. Gene therapy to aid stem cells in wound healing process

Researchers have used gene therapy in a mice study to increase the levels of a protein called Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) which is needed for homing of the bone marrow stem cells to the injured tissue and then have injected lab cultured mice bone marrow stem cells into the mice. When compared with control mice, the ones which were treated by this combination therapy showed better healing. Click to read more...

7. Amniotic Stem cells for treating congenital heart defects

A team of researchers have developed a process which converts amniotic mesenchymal stem cells into pluripotent stem cells, and then again to specific heart cells which have the potential to be used in treating congenital heart defects. Click to read more...

8. New potentials of endothelial cells deciphered

By decoding the entirety of active genes in endothelial cells (cells that line the blood vessels) scientists have discovered new capabilities of these endothelial cells and the study suggests that infusion of engineered endothelial cells could make the cells engraft into injured tissue and acquire the capacity to repair the organ. Click to read more...

9. Evaluating gene signatures of stem cells from each may help to improvise therapies - suggests study

In a recent study when two stem cell lines from human bone marrow, one with ability to form blood vessels when combined with endothelial cells and the other without, were examined for their genetic signatures, it was identified that those with blood vessel forming capability expressed a particular molecule called SLIT3 while the other did not; implying the need for gene signature studies of stem cells for individual patients during clinical application. Click to read more...

10. Cells of the stomach turn back to stem cells even in the absence of injury – identifies study

A new research has identified that a type of cell in the stomach called the chief cell reverts back to the stem cell state in the body even in the absence of noticeable injuries suggesting that these chief cells may be more amenable to reprogramming than earlier thought. Click to read more..

Really???

1. Have you heard of the term "Developmental Noise"? It is a concept in developmental biology in which phenotype varies between individuals though the genotype and environmental factors are same for them. This occurs due to the noise in signaling and signal interpretation. Human fingerprints are a good example of developmental noise as they have been found to be different even among genetically identical twins.

2. Did you know who the youngest Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine is till date? It is Frederick G. Banting, who was 32 years old when he was awarded the Noble prize in Medicine "for the discovery of insulin" in 1923.

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