CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Endogenous stem cell method helps restore vision in human infants with cataract

A new surgical method of cataract removal in which the endogenous lens epithelial stem/progenitor cells (LECs) are preserved in human infants with cataracts has helped in gaining superior visual function in all of the 12 paediatric cataract patients who were treated with this new procedure. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Role of three key molecules in blood stem cell development explored

A combination of ex vivo and in vivo approaches has helped researchers study the interaction between three key molecules during hematopoietic stem cell development in the aorta. If this process could be recreated in the lab it will be potentially useful in developing these cells for clinical use. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Two distinct cell fates during iPS reprogramming

Reprogramming factors such as the OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and MYC (OSKM) which are generally employed for producing induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have given rise to another cell fate known as extraembryonic endoderm stem (XEN) in a recent study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Functional heart muscle bioengineered using skin cells and cadaver hearts

Adult skin cells engineered to become stem cells and decellularized hearts from human cadaver donors have been used by scientists to create cardiac tissue constructs which could be maintained in the culture for nearly 120 days with the tissue constructs exhibiting contractile force and electrical conduction. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Four layered eye tissue engineered using iPS

Using iPS cells, a team from Japan has been able to engineer a four-layered eye tissue containing neural cells, optic vesicles and conjunctival epithelial cells in the lab. The four layered tissue has also been used to grow corneal epithelium which could restore function to defective corneas in rabbits in an animal study by the same team. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Stem cell link to repeated miscarriage deciphered

Scientists have identified that it is the defect in the stem cells of the lining of the womb which leads to repeated miscarriages in some women. Only if these defects are corrected, these women will be able to achieve successful pregnancy according to the study. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Molecule makes blood harvest for stem cell transplant easy

Since current peripheral blood harvesting procedures take a long time and require repeated doses of a stem cell mobilizing factor which may lead to side effects, scientists have come up with a small molecule based strategy which rapidly mobilizes more efficient blood stem cells to the peripheral circulation. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication

8. Drug combination proven to be powerful against lung cancer

Combining the drug auranofin with an experimental targeting agent scientists have been able to block a crucial signalling pathway in the growth of cancer stem cells of KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma . Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Brain stem cells are direct target to Zika- says study

With the global concern surrounding Zika virus, identifying the direct target cells of ZIKV becomes essential. It has been demonstrated that human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) are a direct target to this virus whose infection leads to increased cell death of the hNPCs. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. High fat diet raises cancer risk by boosting stem cells – reveals study

High fat diet boosts intestinal stem cells to grow at a more rapid rate than normal diet in a mice study. Also, the stem cells from such high fat diet fed mice were able to produce "mini-intestines" in vitro more readily than stem cells from normal-fed mice and cause tumours in vivo. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. It has been identified that if it was not for the gene that encodes for a large group of enzymes known as protein kinases, advanced life forms would have never evolved on the earth. The protein kinases helps cells to become larger and transfer information rapidly from one part of the cell to another which formed the basis for different cells to come together and constitute advanced life forms..     
 - Source: Science Daily and The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2016; 291: 5199-5205.

2. 'Eating meat made us humans' according to an anthropological study on a two-inch skull fragment of a 1.5-Million-Year-Old Hominin which exhibited hyperostosis associated with anemia. This anemia could have been caused due to a sudden change to a diet lacking in meat. The study further hypothesizes that meat-eating must have provided the proteins needed for the growth of our brains giving us an evolutionary boost, thus separating us from related species such as chimpanzees which eat little meat compared to humans.    
                                                   -Source: Science Daily and PLoS ONE 2012; 7(10): e46414

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