CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. iPS technology helps in study of rare blood disorder

Using iPS technology researchers have converted mature blood cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (a rare blood disorder) into stem cells in order to study the deletions of human chromosome 7 associated with this disease. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Asymmetric Segregation of aged mitochondria essential for maintaining stemness- Astonishing discovery

It has been identified in a study that when stem cells divide asymmetrically they segregate their aged mitochondria to the daughter cell that will differentiate and the younger mitochondria to their stem cell progeny. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Stem cell choices during differentiation studied using live microscopy

Live video of thousands of progenitor cells of the pancreas has helped researchers understand the dynamics of decisions of those cells when they divide and expand the organ or when they specialize into the endocrine cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Telomere dysfunction in stem cells linked to Lung diseases

It has been reported that when the telomere is defective in some stem cells which are vital to lung cell oxygenation they send out signals which will recruit immune molecules to the lungs and those immune cells cause the severe inflammation which are the characteristic feature of lung diseases like emphysema. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Molecular Pathway that maintains cancer stem cells in aggressive bone cancer elucidated

A research has shown that a DNA binding protein called Sox2 represses the functioning of a tumour suppressive signaling pathway known as Hippo pathway, which leads to an increase of a growth stimulator called YAP that allows the proliferation of cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma (an aggressive bone cancer). Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Molecular switch that governs Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)'s dormancy in blood stem cells discovered

A protein that switches Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) between dormancy and reactivation has been discovered and this protein was found bound to the HCMV genome in latently infected blood stem cells. The protein when exposed to a variety of external stimuli undergoes a modification that allows for viral activation. HCMV is a virus that causes life threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals and organ transplant recipients. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. YAP1 playing a vital role in lung cancer stem cell renewal identified

The mechanism as to how a protein called YAP1 contributes to the growth of lung cancer cells has been identified. The YAP1 binds to a protein called OCT4 and they both together regulate a third protein called SOX2. This regulation maintains the self-renewal of the lung cancer stem cells and help in the formation of blood vessel-like structures from these stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. New designs for 3-D neural tissue constructs using stem cells explored

A recent study has described several new designs for 3D tissue constructs on using stem cells on nanofiber scaffolds within a supportive hydrogel. These designs will be valuable in reconstructing damaged neural tissue. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Exposing Pluripotent stem cells to an anti-cancer drug makes transplantation safe, reports study

To avoid the tumour formation after stem cell therapy, researchers have treated stem cells with mitomycin C, a drug used to treat stomach cancer and these treated stem cells when injected into a mice model of parkinsonism was able to improve the symptoms in the mice without any tumour formation. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Study on hair follicle stem cells offers clues on stem cell regeneration

Studying the hair follicle stem cell niche has made researchers understand the role of niche in stem cell regulation and has helped them discover that stem cells within the pool fed on other dying stem cells and this is a mechanism by which these dead cells are removed. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Are you aware of the long lived plasma cells (LLPC)? Plasma cells are the effector B cells which secrete antibodies (Abs) in our body. LLPCs are those plasma cells which persist in protected microenvironments in the body which keep on secreting Abs, independent of antigenic presence. They serve as memory plasma cells. The relapse and progression of autoimmune diseases such as chronic immune thrombocytopenia, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, or multiple sclerosis have been attributed to these LLPCs and they serve as a potential therapeutic target in these diseases.    
 - Source: Winter O et al. J Immunol. 2012;189(11):5105-11.

2. Did you know what an "auriculosaurus" is? it refers to the mouse with the human ear or the Vacanti mouse which was a laboratory mouse created by Dr. Charles Vacanti and his colleagues in which tissue engineering principles were used to grow ear cartilage in the shape of a human ear on the back of immunocompromised mice using chondrocytes seeded onto a synthetic biodegradable polymer. It represents one of the pioneering efforts in the modern era of tissue engineering and their results along with the image of the mouse with the ear on its back were published in 1997.    
                                               - Source: Wikipedia and Cao Y et al. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1997;100(2):297-302;

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