CURRENT STEM CELL NEWS

1. Normal stem cells and cancer stem cells in prostate cancer share key features, says study

A study has shown that aggressive types of prostate cancer and the normal tissue resident stem cells in the prostate shared the same stem cell signatures and transcription profiles. Targeting the normal stem cell programs can thus help in identifying novel therapies. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

2. Reduced sleep affects stem cell transplantation

A decrease in sleeping time by a mere few hours can impair the transplantation efficiency of blood stem cells according to a new research in mice. Recovery of the sleep restored the reconstitution potential of these stem cells. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

3. Scientists uncover proteins that controls induced pluripotent stem cells

Scientists have identified 16 RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) which can help control the reprogramming of induced pluripotent stem cells. The depletion of these proteins resulted in loss of stem cell pluripotency. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

4. Cone cells created from human embryonic stem cells

Cone cells which are needed for colour discrimination and high-resolution central vision have been created in the lab from human embryonic stem cells. This will be highly useful to transplant these cells in macular degeneration. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

5. Skin cells converted to stable and fully functional placenta-generating cells

Scientists have succeeded in converting skin cells into stable and fully functional placenta-generating cells. These placenta generating cells are also termed as induced trophoblast stem cells (iTSCs). This work will be useful in placental dysfunction diseases. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

6. Neural stem cells promote recovery in Dementia

Transplantation of neural stem cells in transgenic mice with dementia resulted in significant improvement of performance in multiple cognitive functions by expression of neurotrophic factors. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

7. Kidney organoids developed from iPS

Kidney organoids or mini kidneys that contain nephrons along with a collecting duct network have been developed in the lab by directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into progenitors for both collecting ducts and nephrons. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

8. Notch's Intensity of activation controls stem cell fate in embryo- reveals study

The fate of cells in the embryo whether to form the aorta artery or blood stem cells is determined by the signal strength of activation of the Notch molecules according to a recent study published. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

9. Muscle stem cells identified

Scientists have identified human satellite cells that fulfil the muscle stem cell criteria and transplantation of these stem cells to mice resulted in stable engraftment and formation of human-derived muscle fibres. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

10. Stem cells used to create in vitro model for early heart development

Biochemical and biophysical cues have been employed to induce stem cells to self organize into a beating micro-scale human heart and this will be useful as in vitro model for screening drugs which have risk of causing cardiac birth defects. Click to read more... | Click here to view the link of the relevant publication in a peer reviewed journal

Really???

1. Are you aware that elephants in spite of their big body size don't develop cancer so easily? It is because they have 20 copies of a gene called p53 in their genome while humans have only one copy. p53 is a tumour suppressor which acts when there is damage to the DNA and forms the associated p53 protein that either repairs the damage or kills the cell.     
 - Source: www.nature.com/news/how-elephants-avoid-cancer-1.18534

2. Did you know about the first confirmed oncogene (cancer causing gene) to be discovered? It was 'src' which was discovered as an oncogene in a chicken retrovirus in 1970 by Dr. G. Steve Martin of the University of California, Berkeley. Its cellular counterpart was the first proto-oncogene to be discovered in the vertebrates. After that several oncogenes have been identified till date. Many cancer drugs target the proteins encoded by these oncogenes.    
                                                   -Source:Wikipedia and Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2001 Jun;2(6):467-75.

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